part that resembles or suggests an ear in position or form, as the handle of a teacup.

.Origin Expand
before 900; Middle English ere, Old English ēar, æhher; cognate with German Ahre, Old Norse ax, Gothic ahs ear, Latin acus husk {  before 900; Middle English ere (n), Old English erian; cognate with Old Norse erja, Gothic arjan, Latin arāre .

 

Word Origin and History for ear Expand
n.
“organ of hearing,” Old English eare “ear,” from Proto-Germanic *auzon (cf. Old Norse eyra, Danish øre, Old Frisian are, Old Saxon ore, Middle Dutch ore, Dutch oor, Old High German ora, German Ohr, Gothic auso), from PIE *ous- with a sense of “perception” (cf. Greek aus, Latin auris, Lithuanian ausis, Old Church Slavonic ucho, Old Irish au “ear,” Avestan usi “the two ears”).

The belief that itching or burning ears means someone is talking about you is mentioned in Pliny’s “Natural History” (77 C.E.). Until at least the 1880s, even some medical men still believed piercing the ear lobes improved one’s eyesight. Meaning “handle of a pitcher” is mid-15c. (but cf. Old English earde “having a handle”). To be wet behind the ears “naive” is implied from 1914. Phrase walls have ears attested from 1610s. Ear-bash (v.) is Australian slang (1944) for “to talk inordinately” (to someone).

“grain part of corn,” from Old English ear (West Saxon), æher (Northumbrian) “spike, ear of grain,” from Proto-Germanic *akhaz (genitive *akhizaz ; cf. Dutch aar, Old High German ehir, German Ähre, Old Norse ax, Gothic ahs “ear of corn”), from PIE root *ak- “sharp, pointed” (cf. Latin acus “husk of corn,” Greek akoste “barley;”

ear in Medicine Expand
ear (ēr)
n.

The organ of hearing, responsible for maintaining equilibrium as well as sensing sound and divided into the external ear, the middle ear, and the inner ear.

The part of this organ that is externally visible.

The sense of hearing.

ear in Science Expand

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ear 1
(îr)

The vertebrate organ of hearing, which in mammals is usually composed of three parts: the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear. The organs of balance are also located in the ear.

An invertebrate organ analogous to the vertebrate ear.

ear 2
(îr)
The seed-bearing spike of a cereal plant, such as corn or wheat.

ear in Culture Expand
ear definition

The organ of hearing, which also plays a role in maintaining balance. It is divided into the outer ear (from the outside to the eardrum ), the middle ear, and the inner ear.

ear in the Bible Expand

used frequently in a figurative sense (Ps. 34:15). To “uncover the ear” is to show respect to a person (1 Sam. 20:2 marg.). To have the “ear heavy”, or to have “uncircumcised ears” (Isa. 6:10), is to be inattentive and disobedient. To have the ear “bored” through with an awl was a sign of perpetual servitude (Ex. 21:6).

Heritage.Easton’s 1897 Bible Dictionary 

 

 

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